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Pro Hac Vice Admission

Local Rule 9010.2(a) of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin generally limits practice before this court to attorneys admitted to the District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin. The procedures for admission to the District Court may be found at www.wied.uscourts.gov.

In special circumstances, a bankruptcy judge may permit an attorney to appear and participate in a particular case, pro hac vice, if and only if the attorney demonstrates that the attorney:

(1) Is in good standing and eligible to practice before the bar of a federal or state court;

(2) Will have only limited or incidental involvement with the case or adversary proceeding in which the attorney seeks to appear;

(3) Does not expect to appear or participate in any other case or adversary proceeding before this court; and

(4) Has obtained or will obtain the necessary Electronic Case Filing authorization, as detailed at www.wieb.uscourts.gov.

Counsel seeking to appear pro hac vice must file a notice of appearance that states the following: the attorney’s name and address; the name of the attorney’s client; by what court(s) the attorney has been admitted to practice; that the attorney is in good standing and eligible to practice in said court(s); whether the attorney has concurrently or within the year preceding made any pro hac vice application in this court; and the name and address of affiliated local counsel, if applicable. Whenever practicable counsel must file the notice of appearance before making an oral request to appear pro hac vice.

At the first hearing before the bankruptcy judge, counsel should make an oral request to proceed pro hac vice. The judge will, at that first hearing, make the determination whether or not the applicant may continue to proceed pro hac vice or should instead seek admission to the District Court. Permission to appear pro hac vice may be revoked, sua sponte, by the judge to whom the case or proceeding is assigned if the judge determines that counsel has failed to satisfy any applicable requirement.